A red and white striped house in Kensington, London, which was apparently painted by the owner in protest at a planning application being turned down. 
"Making places distinctive may seem “horrendous” at the time. But give it a few years and it can transform the fortunes of a place, because people want to live and invest in “real” places. They don’t want places where, as Gertrude Stein famously said of Los Angeles, “there is no there there”."
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For a long time, it was the chapter on reds that began the exposition on pigments useful to painters. That was already the case in Pliny’s Natural History, which had more to say on red than on any other color. And the same is true for the collections of the medieval recipes intended for illuminators and in the treatises on painting printed in Venice in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
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